Lord Monochromicorn

Best program?

25 posts in this topic

Pencil & Paper :3

Oh, you meant digitally. I'd say either Paint Tool SAI or Photoshop. SAI has an oh so helpful line smoothing tool. It doesn't actually smooth stuff, but it make your stylus movement much smaller, helping you make much smoother lines.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OhHaiDare cover it pretty well.

Illustrator is really good if you want to imitate the look of the show--Or Flash for that matter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SAI has an oh so helpful line smoothing tool. It doesn't actually smooth stuff, but it make your stylus movement much smaller, helping you make much smoother lines.

Photoshop CS5 does something similar. Noticed it with my Wacom tablet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a program called OpenCanvas. It's a less sophisticated program than Photoshop but it gets the job done and also doesn't cost eight million dollars. Yes I realize piracy is an option but I like actually owning my own art program (it cost like $80 which is a fraction of PS's cost)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thing is most these are not compatible with Linux which is the operating system i use. So if any one know any good ones for Linux let me know

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Autodesk Sketchbook Designer 2012.

Combines the best of both worlds (vector and raster), and you can get it free for personal nonprofit use @ the student autodesk website.

Speaking of normal maps.. I totally should start making them for my models.. but i'm too lazy to put in the time to bake them for my models. i should go back later and do it.. lol...

I don't even have any renderers set up =(

http://cg.tutsplus.com/tutorials/autodesk-3d-studio-max/how-to-bake-a-flawless-normal-map-in-3ds-max/

I tried this before, it just took too much time, and my models are so simple and lacking in detail I usually don't need normal maps.. Besides, source uses explicit normals, so you can fix most major errors, so unless you want to bumpmap a model, you don't need them, you can just edit vertex normals directly on the model to fix ugly artifacts.

If you are only going to use linux (ugh?)

get inkscape, it's free.

Edited by friagram

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Use GIMP, get the normals plugin and make them there. Takes me about 1-5 minutes per texture I make...

BG2 is so easy to fuck about with... <3!

Oh.. then it's not quite a normal map, mabye more of a bumpmap?.. you're supposed to use a high poly model and project it onto a low poly model using a cage, then you render the nromal map, and you edit it in a paint program to fix the errors. That link I posted is a pretty good example of how to make a normal map for a model for a video game. I've made bumpmaps for textures before, that's a bit different.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Corel painter is another good program that is overlooked by a lot of people for some reason, if you are a traditional artist you might like it over photoshop.

Photoshop wasn't designed for drawing/patining, it doesn't really even have brush dynamics for interacting with color/paints it just stamps over them (which is what most photo manip programs do).

At least the oils/gels work somewhat like you would expect in painter, the blending is pretty good and you can get it for half the price of PS5, or an older version of painter (11 instead of 12) is like 60 bucks.

I'd still suggest just getting like sketchbook designer, because you can get it free and it's really good and simple to use, with a focus on drawing rather than manipulation.

If you want to sketch stuff and design, go with sketchbook or painter 12 (they support symmetry which photoshop does not)

If you want traditional art styles and tools, use corel painter, it's brush/color engine is unlike any other

If you want manipulation/matte painting with heavy emphasis on custom brushes to paint for you, use photoshop

and if you don't have a tablet or really want to "Draw," use a vector program.

Inkscape is free and multiplatform, but very lacking in features and clunky.

Illustrator has a lot of features, but is somewhat challenging to use for some people, and the pen tool can be hard to adjust to.

Corel painter also has vectors but it's not that great

Sketchbook designer has good vector support that is easy to use, but not quite as many advanced features as illustrator.

If you want to work with vectors, sketchbook designer is probably the easiest to use, illustrator is probably the best if you know how to use it well.

Edited by friagram

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Corel painter is pretty cool, try doing some oil paint's in it. I've done some oils before and -- while not quite the same, it's preferable to the smell of solvent, waiting days for drying, and flushing money down the drain on tubes of oversized paint.

Edited by friagram

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't draw ponies per say, but whenever i do draw things that i want to look good, i make them in paint then transfer them into gimp and smooth them :3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paint Tool SAI is a really great drawing program

Oekaki is also nice just to have fun and experiment with simple tools. maybe we should ask Raini to install a Ponyville oekaki?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Linux FTW.

I know GIMP works well, as I use it myself, and it is open-source and cross-platform.

It doesn't beat Photoshop, but it's still excellent, and Linux-compatible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

linux is just a horrible mess of an operating system, that will probably die out soon. There just is not enough interest from any of the major hardware manufacturers to make it into a functional, quality OS. Hardware vendors are smart enough to avoid wasting their time writing drivers for it, so there's not really any stable support for it, so you get these barely working or really old drivers. Opengl support on nvidia/ati has been shaky for YEARS on newer cards, and sound support has been awful to say the best. Just to get composting to work you have to use ancient versions of opengl in newer cards.... silly.

Major companies like adobe and microsoft avoid porting products and people go and use wine (which is super fail) to run apps on linux.

1 of 2 things is going to happen:

1) linux will become unified into a new os, like android, or chrome, and "linux," along with all of these stupid messy distributions and packaging schemes will die out or become a hobby/learning tool.

2) osx will be ported to all x86 machines, allowing users to switch from/between windows.

Sun had a good thing going with solaris and it's SPARC line, but they've kind of killed themselves, and custom unix operating systems arn't really popular anymore, and probably never will be in the home/workstation setting. As for claiming that linux is good/superior.. it really isn't. The drivers are inferior on every level/way to OSX/Win7 drivers, hardware support is delayed, and virtually all good linux apps have been ported to OSX/Windows environments anyways. Sure directx/direct3d is probably not the best way to go, and opengl is more optimized for professional graphic development, but most consumer products are designed around gaming and windows, which for now - means directx.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

linux is just a horrible mess of an operating system, that will probably die out soon. There just is not enough interest from any of the major hardware manufacturers to make it into a functional, quality OS.

Ubuntu>Windows

sadly I have to use windows for games and whatnot.

Anywho, GIMP is work of art, that allows you to make works of art.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not even close to on-topic.

Make a new thread and post there.

I'm forcefully restraining myself from posting about what you have posted so that this thread doesn't derail.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gimp tries so very hard to do what photoshop does, but has only a fraction of it's tools.

At face it looks like it has them all, but it doesn't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not even close to on-topic.

Make a new thread and post there.

I'm forcefully restraining myself from posting about what you have posted so that this thread doesn't derail.

+1

I'm going to pretend I didn't see it...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

linux is just a horrible mess of an operating system, that will probably die out soon. There just is not enough interest from any of the major hardware manufacturers to make it into a functional, quality OS. Hardware vendors are smart enough to avoid wasting their time writing drivers for it, so there's not really any stable support for it, so you get these barely working or really old drivers. Opengl support on nvidia/ati has been shaky for YEARS on newer cards, and sound support has been awful to say the best. Just to get composting to work you have to use ancient versions of opengl in newer cards.... silly.

Major companies like adobe and microsoft avoid porting products and ponies go and use wine (which is super fail) to run apps on linux.

1 of 2 things is going to happen:

1) linux will become unified into a new os, like android, or chrome, and "linux," along with all of these stupid messy distributions and packaging schemes will die out or become a hobby/learning tool.

2) osx will be ported to all x86 machines, allowing users to switch from/between windows.

Sun had a good thing going with solaris and it's SPARC line, but they've kind of killed themselves, and custom unix operating systems arn't really popular anymore, and probably never will be in the home/workstation setting. As for claiming that linux is good/superior.. it really isn't. The drivers are inferior on every level/way to OSX/Win7 drivers, hardware support is delayed, and virtually all good linux apps have been ported to OSX/Windows environments anyways. Sure directx/direct3d is probably not the best way to go, and opengl is more optimized for professional graphic development, but most consumer products are designed around gaming and windows, which for now - means directx.

not saying your wrong or any thing but i have been using Linux for years. And i must say. It is catching on in popularity. alot of people dual boot it along side windows/mac operating systems. i think if people give it a few more years you will see it in alot more aplications

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now