Suitaloo

Brony Sociology Presentation

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Well, let me set a little background here, today in sociology class, we began to talk about the change in gender roles over the years. I told my professor, and the rest of the class, how there is a shift in male gender roles with bronies. I told her that it's a group of mostly males ages 16-25 who enjoy the newest rendition of My Little Pony. She said "Well that sounds interesting, I'd like to talk to you a bit more about it after class." So I did, and I proposed that I do a full-scale presentation on bronies. She said it was a wonderful idea.

Now, I'd like to ask Ponyville on where I should start. Should I put in clips of an episode? Should I interview famous bronies? Should I showcase fanart? How do I go about this?

When I mentioned bronies in class, people were saying that they hadn't heard about them. I would like to enlighten them on what being a brony is all about, and hopefully convert a few people too.

How I plan to do the project in general: Powerpoint presentation, complete with me wearing a brony shirt, About maybe 30 minutes to an hour long because we have a class period of 1 hour 40 minutes, and I want to showcase all parts of being a brony. Any other ideas are appreciated and this list will be updated with ideas I find good.

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Well some general things would be to explain the exact definition of a brony/pegasister (someone outside of the target demographic watching My Little Pony), the origins of the fandom (4chan as a ironic joke before evolving into the ones who genuinely enjoy the show), why the show is appealing to older audiences, the concept of love and toleration and the various fan projects made from this, including the music scene, fan animations, fan art, fan fiction and custom sculptures and toys. Perhaps also talk about the stereotypes if someone asks or make jokes about how only fat nerds with cheetoo stained fingers would like it, explaining that people from all around the world of various kinds enjoy it.

Also as mentioned earlier, avoid clopping and such, also you should probably not mention things like Little Ms. Rarity either due to the grotesque nature of it. Maaaaybe Cupcakes to explain the massive diversity of fan fiction available.

That's all I can think of at the moment at least. Best of wishes!

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Well, the problem is, I don't know what kind of angle I would come from, because I'm a transfer student to a new public school, so I don't really know anyone or their interests. I suppose I could bring up some of the grimdark stuff to show that it isn't all sunshine and lollipops. Rainbro, if you read this, I would like to see if I could: A. Feature some of your art, and B. Interview you as an artist.

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Doesn't hurt to ask your teacher. She might have some ideas as to a central theme you could build around. Alternatively, you could do a more general overview which looks at the more prominent fan works like Fighting is Magic and the like.

And there's this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Sincerity#Other_arenas

I can't see how it would hurt to bring up some of the grimdark stuff as long as you don't go into too much detail, but you might want to check that with your teacher first just to be safe.

Edited by BrilliantTempest

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I can't see how it would hurt to bring up some of the grimdark stuff as long as you don't go into too much detail, but you might want to check that with your teacher first just to be safe.

Grimdark is a terrible Idea.

People don't want to hear about saddening and stories meant to depress you, or gore-like stories for that matter. If you're looking for an angle where people will be able to relate, grimdark is not one of them.

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I'm hesitant about talking about grimdark. I think it would cause most people to go "WTF?". Kinda like clopping, but perhaps not as bad. Definitely avoid the intense stuff like Cupcakes, IMO.

In addition to other things mentioned, focus on fact that it's a well made cartoon. And even adults can enjoy a well-made kid's cartoon. When something is good enough, it transcends it's target demographic. Also, as Walt Disney said about cartoons, "You're dead if you aim only for kids. Adults are only kids grown up, anyway."

That quote doesn't really cover the female-show-being-enjoyed-by-males part, but again, just focus on the fact that it's just that good. You could also bring in some of the more masculine themes of the show; RD's and AJ's general tomboyish-ness for example.

Rainbro, if you read this, I would like to see if I could: A. Feature some of your art, and B. Interview you as an artist.

Probably. I'd like to approve individually of each piece you're interested in showing. As for the interview? . . .Sure, though I'd prefer a chat or PM interview. I 'd make myself sound like an idiot in real time.

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Keep it positive. And keep it closer to the 30 minute mark. People just don't want to sit there and listen to somebody talk about something for that long unless they are a TREMENDOUSLY engaging speaker, like, somebody who has a lot of practice with public speaking and presentations like this. I'm not calling you boring, I'm calling most people impatient.

But yeah avoid clopping, grimdark, all the more "adult" things that have happened with MLP.

Bring examples of other shows like the Powerpuff Girls that have been girly-themed but had a broader appeal and contrast with the older MLP generations and how different they were from FiM. Contrast with shows like G.I. Joe which are quite evidently aimed solely at boys and show how those sorts of shows don't have broad demographic appeal.

Don't try to win people over. Just tell them about the brony phenomenon and help them perhaps accept bronies instead of being leery of them.

All or none of these could actually be pertinent, hopefully they help a little.

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I think that showing a little clip of the video game Fighting is Magic could make your presentation look cool. It'll also reflect how deeply some bronies love the show, so much that they go and create a full blown video game, independently, based on it.

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Having taken college sociology already, this isn't going to be the easiest presentation off the bat.

You're going to have to focus on how gender roles tie in with this show appealing to an older male demographic. Just presenting about the shows storyline and some of the fan-based content should only be a small part of your presentation.

I'd focus on how a show about promoting friendship, kindness, generosity, etc can appeal to a demographic which isn't well known for these traits and what in modern day society has changed this. This is probably tying in with your lesson plan somehow otherwise you wouldn't have been asked to make a presentation, so it might be prudent to read ahead a little to find some specific examples to use. You should also be able to come up with some specific examples based off your experience with the fanbase and possibly get some advice from your teacher/professor if you get stuck. Then you can work in some of the extra fan stuff to support those examples.

Anything that doesn't go within that, I'd limit or avoid all together (i.e. what has already been mentioned to avoid :wink: )

Hopefully this helps!

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I can't see how it would hurt to bring up some of the grimdark stuff as long as you don't go into too much detail, but you might want to check that with your teacher first just to be safe.

Grimdark is a terrible Idea.

Sorry, that's probably more of a cultural difference. We're far more laid-back where I come from, and stuff like that doesn't tend to bother us unless it's explicitly described. My bad.

You could argue that our ideals regarding gender equality tend to be more focused on females. We see gender equality as females being brought into line with males and not the other way around. As a result, while some male-oriented entertainment is now featuring more female characters, many of whom are strong in their own right (even if they sometimes act as a damsel in distress) it's still considered strange for female-oriented entertainment to appeal to men. Bronies therefore represent the other aspect of gender equality, which is men being able to enjoy female-oriented stuff as well. In other words the (male) bronies are a perfectly natural consequence of increased equality between genders, something that entertainment producers, among others, have so far failed to understand (with a few exceptions, obviously).

Hope that helps in some way.

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I think that showing a little clip of the video game Fighting is Magic could make your presentation look cool. It'll also reflect how deeply some bronies love the show, so much that they go and create a full blown video game, independently, based on it.

Not to mention Ponykart

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Listen to Rac. This is a Sociology presentation, no one is going to want to sit through half an hour of "Hey, guys, look at what we Bronies can do!". The purpose of this presentation should really be more along the lines of "How does this weird group of people deviate from social norms today, let alone those of other weird people who like other things?".

Art and videos are nothing but fluff. Talk to Johnny Hoof, see if you can talk to his dad about the Brony Study, THAT is the angle you need to be taking.

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